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Amsterdam or Milan; a vs city comparison and travel guide

Both Amsterdam and Milan are fantastic cities, but which is better for your city-break or holiday?

We understand your dilemma. There is a wealth of information about both cities, but little stating which is the better destination and more suited for your trip.
This article will provide our unbiased opinions, and hopefully help you to choose the best city to visit.

The article is divided into the following sections, and can be jumped to using the underlined links:
1) Introductions -
2) City scores -
3) Which one should I, friends, or family visit? -
4) When to visit and weather -
5) Who is the city suited for? -
6) The perfect 48hours (with map) -
7) Tourism details (where to stay? airport details?)

Introduction to Milan and Amsterdam

Mention the name Milan, and it instantly conjures up visions of fashion, refinement and exclusive shopping. This is a city where looking your finest is an obsession, and even the main tourist attraction, the Galleria, is shopping arcade. Luxury brands and designer boutiques may fill the historic centre but out on the outskirts are edgy districts where this creativity originated from.

As a visitor, you should realise that Milan does not have the breadth of monuments and standout tourist attractions as of other Italian cities. This is primarily a business focused city, which reveres in sophistication and looking good.

High-level summary Amsterdam and milan

Summary
Which city would I go to?
Amsterdam
Which one would I recommend to my parents?
Amsterdam
Which location for my 19-year-old cousin?
Amsterdam
Which for my food obsessed friend?
Amsterdam
Note: The above comparison does not consider the weather, and assumes travel at the best time of year (which is detailed later in this article)

The following sections compare the two cities and considers; how long to spend in them, when to visit, and provides suggested 48hours in each city (along with an interactive map). The final section is tourism practicalities and includes which airport to fly into, what district to be based in and how best to explore the city.
We hope that you find all of this information useful, in planning your next exciting trip!

Destination details

How long to spend in the city?

The main sights of Milan can be easily seen in a single day of sightseeing. A second day allows time to explore the more atmospheric districts (Navigli, Zona Tortona) or provides extra time for shopping. To capture the essence of the city, you need to experience the early evening drinks culture and the evening strolls where everyone wears their finest clothes.
Milan may lack many tourist sights, but there surrounding region certain compensates with many enjoyable day trips. This includes the historic towns of Bergamo, Brescia and Pavia, the beautiful lakes of Garda, Maggiore and Como, plus the Italian Alps. It is even possible to visit Verona as a day trip.

Three days is ideal to get a good flavour of Amsterdam, and in this time you could include a quick day trip out of town. Much less and it might feel a bit rushed, especially if you are visiting for the first time.

If you can afford more time, there are a surprising amount of places worth visiting in the surrounding area. Many people like to visit Keukenhof in spring, the largest flower garden in the world. There are also the Zaanse Schans Windmills and fairy-tale castle ‘Kasteel De Haar’ not too far away.
Lots of people also like to visit one of the numerous planned cities built on land reclaimed from the sea such as Almere or Lelystad, a short 20-minute train ride from the central train station. Because these cities are so new, they have prided themselves on drawing on the latest innovations in architectural design.

For the real Milan experience, you want to visit during the summer or winter fashion weeks (Sep/Oct or Feb/Mar), to mingle with models, stylish and Aficionados. For a city break, Milan is almost year-round, but it is cool and possibly wet in the winter, while in hot August most residents head to the beach for the whole month.

One of the quirks of Milan is at the weekends, most of its affluent or mobile residents leave the city for the coast (summer), the Alps (winter) or lakes (Spring/Autumn), leaving the city to tourists and foreign shoppers.

Spring is the best time of year to visit Amsterdam before the summertime high tourist season hits, and you can catch either the King’s Day festival in April or awe at the sea of tulips at Keukenhof.

The warmest month in Amsterdam is August with average temperatures of around 22 degrees (71F) which isn’t that hot! It gets pretty chilly in winter, down to just above freezing. The weather is generally very changeable all year round so we recommend you be prepared for all weathers at all times! It could easily rain or be windy for at least one of the days you are there.

There’s something for everyone in Amsterdam.
While it has historically attracted hipsters, it also has a lot to offer to those looking for a peaceful and relaxed place to getaway. It’s easy to follow one of the canals out from Rembrandtplein in the centre to a quieter neighbourhood such as Jordaan or Prinsengracht either on foot or by bike, or even better, floating along by canal boat.

Believe it or not, Amsterdam is also an incredibly family-friendly city. The relaxed approach to parenting permeates its museums, sights and events and the city is home to hundreds of playgrounds and child-friendly cafes.

If you adore fashion, embrace style, and willing to spend a little extra, then Milan is calling you. The city excels in designer shopping, trend-setting, and simply looking good.

Many visitors leave Milan slightly disappointed; it is without the flare of Rome, the culture of Florence, or the photo opportunities of Venice. Milan is a business city, where the reward for the industrious attitude of its residents, is cutting edge fashion and sophisticated nightlife.
Insight: There are few historic buildings in Milan, as many were destroyed by the extensive bombing of the second world war.

48 hours in Milan.

Begin the first day at the Piazza del Duomo, the heart of Milan. On this plaza is the gothic Duomo di Milano cathedral (head to the roof for amazing views) and the beautiful Galleria shopping complex, filled with boutiques and exclusive retailers. On the opposite side is the Palazzo Marino, and the elegant Teatro alla Scala.

For afternoon explore the sights around the Sforzinda castle and Parco Sempione. Do include the Santa Maria delle Grazie convent, where the famed “The Last Supper” fresco is housed. For the latter part of the explore the chic Brera district, with its mix of high-end stores and fashionable people.
The early evening is when Milan excels, as the offices close and workers head to the bars for Apericena (happy hour with light buffet food) to drink exquisite cocktails and flaunt the latest fashions; Navigli is a great area to experience this modern cultural tradition.

Santa Maria delle Grazie milan

The Santa Maria delle Grazie convent, the location of one of the most controversial religious paints….

For the second day, wander down from the Duomo along the bustling Via Torino and then the Corso di Porta Ticinese, passing the Basilica San Lorenzo Maggiore, and enter the atmospheric Navigli district. This canal district is filled with artisan shops, fashionable bars, and where young Milanese frequent.

The canal and train lines separate Navigli from Zona Tortona, the once-gritty but now design and creative hub of Milan. Here designers create the latest fashions in the former warehouses. Understatedly cool, but the place to experience the drive and passion of the Milanese.
If you are a football fan, you probably want to include the tour of the San Siro stadium, in the second day.

48hours in Amsterdam

Start on day 1 in the Museum Quarter where some of Amsterdam’s world-class museums are. Rijksmuseum where Rembrandt’s ‘The Night Watch’ is held can be found here, as well as the Van-Gogh Museum and Stedelijk Museum, which contains a huge collection of everything from sculpture to painting to photography by artists such as Picasso and Warhol.

In the afternoon, head to the artisan area of Jordaan. It has a homely charm to it with all the houseboats along the quays and old crooked buildings.
If you’re looking for a night out, head to the areas of Leidseplein or Rembrandtplein in the evening.

Royal Palace Amsterdam

Spring at Dam Square with the Royal Palace in the background.

On day 2 head to Dam Square and the Royal Palace then the red-light district.
A visit to the Anne Frank House is a fascinating and sobering experience but this can get very busy so we recommend booking ahead online for a specific time.
If you are looking for something a bit slower paced in the evening - a great photo opportunity is from the Magere Brug. After dark, this bridge is illuminated by over a thousand lights and due to its location, it makes for a good vantage point where you can see 15 bridges at the same time.

All cities have their perils but with regards to Amsterdam, probably the main ones to consider are bike safety and caution in the "coffee shops". As well as the usual bike safety rules you’d expect at home, keep an eye out for nippy scooters on the bike lanes and avoid rush hour if possible. In terms of the coffeeshop visits – don’t underestimate the effects of the products, as the varieties sold here are more potent than elsewhere.

Amsterdam is typically an extremely safe city for solo female travellers but it’s not advised to visit the Red Light District at night as the area does have a seedier vibe.

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